Oceana | Protecting the World's Oceans

Fight Seafood Fraud: Have One Name for One Fish

Do you really know what’s on your plate?

The use of ambiguous names for seafood sold in the U.S. prevents consumers from making sustainable choices and can harm your health. You could be eating a critically endangered fish and never know better.

But there’s a solution. Adopting one name for one fish that follows seafood throughout the supply chain has the ability to enhance honest businesses’ bottom lines, protect at-risk species and help consumers make informed decisions.

Tell the President’s Task Force on Seafood Fraud and Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported Fishing to adopt one name for one fish >>

Your Info

    Not ? Click here.

    Dear Melissa Beaudry, Quality Officer, Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection:

    I am writing to express my serious concern on the high rates of seafood fraud occurring in the United States and ambiguity of seafood names that are used for consumer labeling. Seafood fraud investigations have found time and time again that the seafood consumers are purchasing are often mislabeled. In order to prevent seafood fraud and keep illegally caught fish from entering the U.S. market, the United States must require the use of one name for one fish. For documentation and traceability purposes, the scientific name must follow the fish, as it is universally recognized around the globe, and remain with the seafood as it moves throughout the supply chain. Either the scientific name or the common name must be available to seafood consumers that want to know more about their seafood either on packaging, labels or by request at restaurants.

    When it comes to fish, we call so many different species by the same name. For example, a fisherman in Panama could catch a Warsaw grouper considered critically endangered and sell it legally in the U.S. simply as “grouper.” With wide ranges in the sustainability of the grouper fishery, consumers have no way to make an informed seafood buying decision.

    I urge the Administration to mandate species specific names for all seafood. The adoption of one name for one fish that follows seafood throughout the supply chain has the ability to enhance honest businesses’ bottom lines and protect at-risk species. Having more information helps consumers choose the fish that are more sustainable, healthier, and come from legal fisheries.

    Sincerely,